Tag Archive Nutrition

Nutrition for Supporting the Adrenal Glands

With the stressful pace of modern living in the West, the adrenal glands can struggle to keep up! Your adrenal glands secrete adrenaline and other stress hormones to help you to cope with stress. When you are feeling exhausted, your adrenals give you the energy to keep going!

With constant stress, your adrenals are continuously being stimulated until they crash. This is when you can experience adrenal fatigue.

Symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue include:

  • Unable to get out of bed in the morning
  • Feeling constantly exhausted
  • Craving salty foods
  • Feel wired in the evening and unable to sleep.

People with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS/ME) often have adrenal fatigue leaving them bed bound.

So how can you use nutrition for supporting the adrenal glands?

Nutrition for Supporting the Adrenal Glands:

  • Vitamin C – boosts your adrenal glands
  • B vitamins – give you energy and help your adrenals to keep going.
  • Himalayan Pink Salt – salt supports your adrenal glands. Also Himalayan pink salt is rich in other minerals to support your adrenals. Add a pinch of this salt to all your meals.
  • Potassium – is another mineral that boosts your adrenal glands. Also it balances the sodium:potassium ratio in your cells to allow more nutrients into the cells. You can get potassium from foods including bananas, mangoes, spinach, sweet potato, acorn squash and coconut water.
  • Ashwaganda – is a herb to that helps you adapt to stress.

Foods to Avoid for Adrenal Fatigue:

  • Caffeinated foods and drinks – such as tea, coffee and chocolate all drive your adrenals to exhaustion and are best avoided.
  • Sugary foods – such as cakes, biscuits and sweets all spike your blood sugar and soon after you crash as your blood sugar drops. This puts a strain on your adrenal glands.

For more information on using nutrition for supporting your adrenal glands, contact Kate for a free 15 minute phone chat.

 

How Much Protein Do I Need?

Protein is not just for great skin, hair, and nails; it’s critical for health. Without it, you wouldn’t be able to repair damage, digest food, fight infections, build muscle and bone, create hormones, and even think and have good moods. Higher protein diets can help fight high blood pressure, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Not to mention protein’s great benefits for metabolism boosting, satiety (feeling full after a meal), and weight management.

Protein is important, and this is a given.

There are a few factors to consider when calculating how much protein we need. I go through those calculations with you. Then I list the amount of protein in some common foods.

How much protein do I need?

There isn’t a real rule that applies equally to everyone. There are a few factors to consider when figuring out how much protein you need.

Start with the minimum recommendation of 0.8 g/kg (0.36 g/lb) per day.

So, for a 68 kg (150 lb) healthy non-athlete adult, this is about 55 g protein/day.

Mind you, this is a minimum to prevent protein deficiency. It’s not optimal for good repair, digestion, immune function, muscle/bone building, hormones, thinking and great moods. It’s not enough for athletes, the elderly, or those recovering from an injury, or an illness such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, either. If you fall into one of these camps, you may need to increase the minimum protein intake. Aim closer to 1.3 g/kg (0.6 g/lb) per day.

Athletes need more protein for their energy and muscle mass. Seniors need more to help ward off muscle and bone loss that’s common in old age. And injured people need more for recovery and healing.

How much protein is too much?

As with fat and carbohydrates, eating too much protein can cause weight gain. Extra protein can be converted into sugar or fat in the body. The interesting thing about protein is that it isn’t as easily or quickly converted as carbohydrates or fat; this is because of its “thermic effect.” The thermic effect is the amount of energy required to digest, absorb, transport and store a nutrient. To digest protein, your body needs to spend energy (i.e., burn calories). More calories than when metabolising fats or carbohydrates.

If you’re concerned that high protein intake harms healthy kidneys, don’t be. If your kidneys are healthy, they are more than capable of filtering out excess amino acids from the blood. The problem only occurs in people who already have kidney issues.

FUN FACT: Plant proteins are especially safe for kidney health.

How much protein is in food?

  • A 3.5 oz chicken breast has 31 g protein.
  • A 3.5 oz salmon has 20 g protein.
  • ½ cup cooked beans contain 6-9 g protein.
  • A large egg contains 6 g protein.
  • ¼ cup nuts contains 4-7 g protein.
  • 1 medium baked potato contains 3 g protein.

Conclusion

Protein is an essential nutrient we should all get enough of. How much protein do I need? “Enough” is about 0.8 – 1.3 g/kg (0.36 – 0.6 g/lb) per day. If you’re a healthy non-athlete adult, you can aim for the lower level. If you’re an athlete, senior, or injured person, aim for the higher level.

Too much protein can cause weight gain, so it’s best to have just enough.

I’d love to know: Are you one of those people who needs more protein? Leave a comment and let me know.

Recipe (high-protein): Baked Chicken Breasts

Serves 4

Ingredients

4 boneless skinless chicken breasts
1 tbsp olive oil
1 clove garlic
1/4 tsp sea salt
½ tsp black pepper
½ tsp paprika

Instructions

Preheat oven to 450°F. Place a layer of parchment paper on a baking dish.

Place the chicken breasts in the prepared dish. Brush on both sides with olive oil.
In a small bowl, mix spices until combined. Sprinkle the spice mixture evenly over the chicken on both sides.

Bake for 15-20 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through to at least 165°F at the thickest part.
Serve & enjoy!

Tip: Serve with lots of veggies.

For more information about protein or if you are interested in purchasing my high protein vegetarian or non-vegetarian meal plan, contact Kate on 07562868342 or send a message in the contact form below! I would love to hear from you.

Mood Boosting Foods

No question that what you eat can affect how you feel, right?

Mental health and brain health are complex. So are the foods we eat, and the ways our bodies interact with those foods. While, we don’t know the exact mechanisms how food and nutrition help, we know a few ways food impacts our moods.

First, what we eat becomes the raw materials for our neurotransmitters. “Neurotransmitters” are biochemical messengers that allow our nerve cells to communicate (ever heard of serotonin?). They are important not just for thinking and memory, but also for mental health.

Second, what we eat affects our blood sugar. And having unstable blood sugar levels can contribute to mood swings.

Let’s talk about mood-boosting and mood boosting foods.

Mood boosting foods

Some nutrient deficiencies look like mental health problems; this includes deficiencies in B-vitamins, vitamin D, and the mineral selenium. So, getting enough vitamins, minerals, (and other things like antioxidants) are key. These nutrients not only reduce inflammation but also fuel the biochemical reactions in our bodies. Including those that create neurotransmitters. So make sure you’re eating a variety of nutrient-dense whole foods, especially fresh fruits and vegetables. In fact, studies show that people who eat the most fruits and vegetables are the happiest.

Also pay special attention to vitamin D (the sunshine vitamin), as it’s not naturally occurring in too many foods. Selenium is an essential mineral found in Brazil nuts, walnuts, cod, and poultry. Try to add some of those to your weekly diet.

Second, make sure you get enough protein. Protein is your body’s main supply of amino acids. Amino acids are very important for mood issues because they are the building blocks of neurotransmitters. Protein also helps to regulate blood sugar. I recommend eating protein with every meal; this includes dark green leafy vegetables, eggs, poultry, and meat.

Third, complex carbohydrates like sweet potato and quinoa are great too. They allow better absorption of key amino acids like tryptophan. Tryptophan is used by your body to make serotonin (your “happy hormone”) and melatonin (your “sleepy” hormone). So, if you want to relax, try these in the evening.

Fourth, fish and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids (nuts, seeds, and algae) are also mood-boosting. Omega-3s are definitely “brain food” and may help to ease some symptoms.

FUN FACT: One study showed that giving one multi-vitamin and one omega-3 fish oil tablet per day to prison inmates reduced the incidence of violent behaviour by 50%!

Last but not least, make sure you’re hydrated. Mild dehydration can cause mood issues as well.

 

Mood Busting Foods

You won’t be surprised to hear me say processed foods are mood-busters, right? One study suggests that eating a lot of processed foods devoid of nutrients can increase your chances of becoming depressed by as much as 60 percent! This is on top of the research that shows nutrient deficiencies can look like mental health problems.

“But it makes me feel good!”

Yes, some of these mood busters can make you feel better temporarily. Some big food companies study how to maximise the “pleasure” centres with the perfect amount of sugar, salt, and fat. Not to mention the colour, texture, and taste; they can light up our taste buds and make us feel good… for now.

A few other things to avoid are:

  • Alcohol (nervous system depressant)
  • Caffeine (may worsen anxious feelings and ability to sleep)
  • Sugar (messes with your blood sugar and can worsen inflammation).

Conclusion

Bad moods can lead to bad eating habits; and, bad eating habits can lead to bad moods. If you need a mood boost, stick to minimally processed nutrient-dense whole foods. Things like fresh fruit and vegetables (including leafy greens), nuts and seeds, eggs, fish, poultry, and meat. Avoid common mood-busting foods like alcohol, caffeine, and sugar.

And remember, sometimes “feel good” junk foods, only make you feel good temporarily. So, try my newest recipe for fruit salad, below.

Recipe (Mood Boosting): Fruit Salad

Serves 3-4

Ingredients

300g watermelon, cubed
300g cantaloupe melon, cubed
150g blueberries, fresh
150g blackberries, fresh
300g green grapes

Instructions

Place all fruit in a large bowl and gently toss.

Serve and enjoy!

Tip: Substitute or add any ready-to-eat fruit, like chopped peaches, or raspberries.

 

For more information on mood boosting foods, contact Kate for a free 15 minute consultation!

Natural Remedies to Relieve PMS

When you have pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) you may have symptoms including mood swings, anxiety, depression, breast tenderness, migraines and cramps. You get these symptoms in the week leading up to the start of your period. You may feel very uncomfortable and find it difficult to go about your day to day activities. Below I talk about natural remedies to relieve PMS.

Many women’s period cycles are in time with the 28 day cycles of the moon.

Here are my natural remedies to relieve PMS and the 4 types of PMS:

  • PMS A (Anxiety) – you may get anxiety, tension, anger and irritability with this type of PMS. It is the most common type of PMS.
  • PMS D (Depresssion) – people with this type of PMS get severe depression, tearfulness and withdrawal that can affect their everyday live. They may even feel suicidal. It is caused by low levels of the hormone progesterone and high levels of oestrogen. You need to eat more phytoestrogen containing foods such a flaxseed/linseed and fermented soya. When you eat phytoestrogens, these food block the oestrogen receptor sites in the body causing a weaker oestrogen effect.
  • PMS H (Hyperhydration) – you may get water retention, swelling, bloating, weight gain and breast tenderness with this hydration type of PMS. You need to avoid eating too much salt which increases the swelling.
  • PMS C (Cravings) – you can get strong cravings for sugar snacks and chocolate with this type of PMS. Also you may get blood sugar imbalance, headaches and fatigue.

Most women experience a different type of PMS before each period.

Natural remedies to relieve PMS including herbs:

  • Agnus castus – when you take this herb it stimulates your pituitary gland to balance the secretions of all of your hormones. It is very effective for relieving PMS and needs to taking everyday for 3 months.
  • Black cohosh – taking this herb can relieve symptoms of PMS A including anxiety and tension as well as headaches and migraines.
  • Milk thistle – helps to support your liver in detoxifying excess oestrogen and other hormones.

Caution – do not take these herbs if you are on the pill, on HRT or pregnant.

Furthermore if you would like to learn more nutrition tips for relieving PMS, contact Kate on 07562 868342 for a free 15 minute consultation!

 

Copyright: andreypopov / 123RF Stock Photo

Tips for Recovering from ME/CFS

Around 250,000 people in Britain are recognised as having M.E or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). Many more are undiagnosed. I suffered with severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome for 3 years. It was after visiting a Nutritionist and following her plan for a few months that I began to get my energy back. After a year I was fully recovered and back working again. Below you can read my tips for recovering from ME/CFS.

 

 

Common Symptoms

  • Chronic, debilitating fatigue
  • Muscle pains
  • Headaches
  • Poor concentration
  • Low blood pressure
  • Insomnia
  • Sensitivity to light and noise
  • Constipation

Causes of Chronic Fatigue

  • Stress
  • Viral infections e.g. Glandular Fever or Cytomegalovirus.
  • Unprocessed emotional trauma
  • Exposure to a lot of electrical equipment (EMR)
  • Have running water under your home (Geopathic stress)
  • Polio vaccination
  • Low blood sugar level
  • Heavy metal toxicity
  • Liver congestion
  • Food intolerances
  • Candida overgrowth
  • Parasites
  • Adrenal fatigue
  • Deficiencies of minerals e.g. magnesium

 

Tips for Recovering from ME/CFS

Foods to Avoid

  • Avoid any foods and drinks containing caffeine, sugar and alcohol, all of which lower the immune function, weaken the adrenal system and cause imbalance with blood sugar levels.
  • Most mass produced, tinned foods and takeaways are lacking in magnesium. Most M.E patients have low levels if this vital mineral.
  • Avoid energy drinks such as Red Bull which contain caffeine which will only serve to weaken you in the long term.
  • If you find yourself constantly craving foods such as wheat, sugar and snacks, are bloated, have an urgency to urinate, suffer mood swings and are always tired, you may well have Candida overgrowth. Follow the anti-candida diet.
  • Almost everyone with chronic fatigue will have multiple food intolerances, the most common being to wheat and cow’s milk.

Foods to Eat

  • Essential fats are vital for people with M.E since they support the endocrine system, boost immunity and help to balance blood sugar. Therefore eat more pumpkin seeds, flaxseeds, walnuts and oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, anchovies, sardines and herring.
  • It is vital that you eat good-quality protein such as organic meat, chicken, fresh fish, beans or lentils at least twice a day. Protein boosts the immune system and helps to balance blood sugar for longer periods.
  • Eat plenty of wholegrain cereals, leafy green vegetables such as cabbage, kale, spring greens, pak choy, broccoli, and brazil nuts, walnuts, almonds, curries, black strap molasses and beans which are all rich in magnesium.
  • Replace wheat with amaranth, buckwheat, quinoa, millet, brown rice, oats and wheat free bread.
  • Drink at least 2 litres of filtered water daily to help detoxify your system.

Lifestyle Tips

  • Do some gentle exercise such a pilates stretches to gradually tone the muscles and help to drain the lymph system which is often overloaded.
  • Learn to relax. Meditation is a great way to give the body and brain a complete rest. Try listening to relaxing music such as sounds of nature.
  • Have a massage to drain the lymph system and soothe aching muscles.
  • Look into ozone therapy to oxygenate the body.
  • Many people have been cured of M.E by energy healers.
  • If you symptoms persist, try having your house dowsed for electrical and geopathic stress. To find a dowser contact The British Dowsing Society.
  • Visit a counsellor as many people discover that their ME/CFS was triggered by an emotional trauma and speaking about it helps you to process it.

Recommended Testing

  • I would recommend hair mineral analysis testing for ME/CFS. This test can show you if you have adrenal fatigue, thyroid problems, blood sugar imbalances and the levels of toxic metals in your body. It can also show you the levels of minerals such as magnesium, calcium and zinc in your cells.
  • Also I would recommend doing a food intolerance blood test to check for sensitivities to wheat, cow’s milk and other foods. Alternatively you can find a practitioner who uses a bio-feedback machine to test for food intolerances as well as for the presence of viruses and Candida.

 

Furthermore if you would like to learn more nutrition tips for recovering from ME/CFS, contact Kate on 07562 868342 for a free 15 minute consultation!

 

10 Anti-Inflammatory Foods

In the western world we eat a diet high in wheat, dairy, sugar. These foods can cause acidity and inflammation in the body. Our diet is high in omega 6 and low in omega 3 which can lead to production of arachadonic acid and inflammatory pathways in the body. This can lead to chronic inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and heart disease. However we have the power to reduce inflammation and feel better by changing our diet. When we include anti-inflammatory foods in our diet, inflammation and pain can be eased. Furthermore your joints work more smoothly, cell membranes are held together and immune cells produces less histamine.

Here are my recommended top 10 anti-inflammatory foods:

  1. Oily fish – is rich in omega 3 that stimulates anti-inflammatory pathways in the body, reducing inflammation. Oily fish rich in omega 3 include mackerel, sardines, salmon, anchovies and herring.
  2. Ginger – is a root herb that improves circulation in the fingers and toes. Also it can prevent nausea and reduce inflammation in the body.
  3. Turmeric -is a spice that can reduce inflammation. It decreases permeability in the blood-brain barrier to prevent brain inflammation and cognitive decline. Furthermore it fights cancer.
  4. Nuts & seeds – plant based sources of omega 3 include walnuts, flaxseed/linseed, chia seeds, hemp seeds and pumpkin seeds.
  5. Green leafy vegetables – are rich in minerals and alkalise the body, reducing acidosis and the associated inflammation. Also they are rich in vitamin C which acts as a natural anti-histamine to reduce inflammation.
  6. Extra virgin olive oil – contains the chemical oleocanthal that acts similarly to ibuprofen to reduce pain and inflammation.
  7. Garlic – this potent herb can help to reduce joint swelling.
  8. Green tea – is rich in polyphenol antioxidants and helps to reduce inflammation.
  9. Blueberries – are rich in the antioxidant quercetin that protects the body from oxidant stress, reducing inflammation.
  10. Pineapple – contains the digestive enzyme bromelain. Bromelain helps to regulate the immune system and prevent unwanted inflammation.

Finally if you would like more information about how to reduce pain and inflammation, contact Kate on 07652 868342 or info@kateoriordan.com. You can receive personalised advice including a nutrition plan and supplement plan.

Copyright: andrelix / 123RF Stock Photo

Anti-Candida Diet

Candida Albicans is a yeast that is found in found in low levels in the gut. However problems can arise when the yeast begins to overgrow in the gut. When you follow an anti-Candida diet, it can help to reduce the Candida naturally without the use of antibiotics.

 

 

Causes of Candida Overgrowth:

  • Overuse of antibiotics
  • Long-term use of the pill
  • Steroids
  • Chemotherapy
  • Diabetes
  • HIV
  • Pregnancy

Symptoms of Candida Overgrowth:

  • Bloating
  • Flatulence
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhoea
  • Cravings for sugar and wheat
  • Headaches
  • Brain fog
  • Mood swings
  • Skin rashes
  • Recurrent thrush
  • Arthritis-type aching joints
  • Chronic fatigue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to treat Candida Naturally

It is crucial to kill the Candida or keep it under control by using an anti-Candida diet, herbs and supplements.

Anti-Candida Diet

Foods to Avoid:

  • Remove all yeast and fermented food from the diet for 2-4 weeks. This includes bread, all aged or mouldy cheese, beer, wine, vinegar, miso, tempeh and mushrooms. Also avoid mould forming foods such as peanuts, peanut butter and cashew nuts.
  • Try to avoid all white-flour products for at least one month including crackers, pizza and pasta.
  • Avoid any form of sugar for one month including cane sugar, beet sugar, honey and really sweet fruits such as bananas, raisins and dates. Also avoid fruit juices and canned drinks for this period as they are high in sugar.

 

Foods to Eat:

  • Garlic is a potent anti-fungal. Raw is best.
  • Eat fresh fish, chicken, turkey, lean meats, eggs, cooked tofu and pulses.
  • Eat more artichokes, asparagus, aubergine, avocado, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, celery, green beans, leeks, lettuce, garlic, onion, parsnips, spinach, tomatoes and watercress.
  • Fruits that are okay to eat during the detox are apples, pears, raspberries, blueberries and cherries.
  • Use low-sugar organic rice or almond milk instead of cow’s milk.
  • Eat live, unsweetened yoghurt containing healthy bacteria acidophilus and bifidus.
  • Make your own dairy free water kefir which is a probiotic.

If you would like a detailed diet and supplement plan that is personalised to your specific requirements, contact Kate to book an initial consultation.

Copyright: dolgachov / 123RF Stock Photo

Foods for Underactive Thyroid

1 in 5 women have underactive thyroid also known as hypothyroidism. Underactive thyroid is a condition where your thyroid gland is not producing enough of the thyroid hormone T4. The thyroid gland is situated just below the ‘Adam’s Apple’ or larynx, and is responsible for running the whole of your body’s metabolism. When the thyroid gland is under-functioning and all metabolic processes slow down, a multitude of debilitating symptoms can arise.

Common Symptoms

  • Chronic constipation
  • Temperature test below 36.6ºC
  • Slow heart rate
  • Sensitive to cold weather
  • Chronic fatigue and weakness
  • Excess hair loss
  • Gain weight easily
  • Skin problems (dry, flaky skin)
  • Depression
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Cry easily
  • Headaches/dizziness
  • Feel worse in the morning
  • Feel better after exercising
  • Brittle fingernails
  • Loss of libido

 

You can support thyroid health with good nutrition. Here I list the foods to avoid and foods for underactive thyroid.

Foods to Avoid

  •  Avoid raw goitrogens including Brassica-family foods e.g. cabbage, kale, cauliflower, broccoli, turnips and Brussels sprouts. If eaten cook these foods first to inactivate the goitrogens.
  • Avoid consuming soya foods e.g. soy milk, tofu, miso, tempeh.
  • Check for gluten sensitivity and if there is an issue avoid gluten containing foods e.g. wheat, barley, rye and oats.

 

Foods for Underactive Thyroid

  • Iodine is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis. Get the RDI for iodine of 150ug from iodised sea salt, shellfish, seawater fish and edible seaweeds such as kelp, dulse and Nori rolls.
  • Tyrosine is an amino acid and an essential component for the synthesis of thyroid hormones. Good sources include cheese, all meats, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds and eggs.
  • Selenium is required by the enzyme that converts thyroid hormone T4 into the more active T3 thyroid hormone. Get the recommended daily intake of selenium by eating 3 brazil nuts per day.
  • Eat zinc rich foods including fish, seafood and pumpkin seeds to support the conversion of the thyroid hormone T4 to the active form T3.
  • Liquorice root provide herbal support for the adrenal glands. It is important to support the adrenal glands because they are closely linked to the thyroid gland.

 

Lifestyle Tips

  • Take levothyroxine 30 minutes away from calcium rich foods e.g. milk which compete for absorption.
  • Use relaxation techniques e.g. yoga, Tai Chi, massage or meditation. It is important to reduce stress which depletes the thyroid.
  • Get adequate vitamin D levels by getting sunlight on bare face, arms and legs for at least 20 minutes daily.
  • 30 minutes exercise at least 3x per week stimulates the thyroid. However avoid intense exercise on the treadmill.
  • Use fluoride-free toothpaste to avoid fluoride which competes with iodine.
  • Install a pure water filter to the main tap and shower to remove chlorine in tap water which completes with iodine.
  • Moderate alcohol intake with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis.

 

Copyright: dolgachov / 123RF Stock Photo

How To Lose Weight and Keep It Off

Many people believe that dieting is the best way to lose weight. They have tried all the popular diets such as the Atkins diet, 5:2 diet and juice fast diet. Somehow they always end up putting the weight back on and more after finishing the diet. Why is this? When you suddenly fast your body goes into starvation mode and your metabolism slows down to conserve energy. When you eventually give in to your body’s signal to eat, your body holds on to more fat in case there is a famine again. This is a negative cycle of dieting and putting on weight. So now I will explain how to lose weight and keep it off.

The best way to lose weight is to eat healthily. Making gradually changes to your diet including reducing processed, sugary foods and increasing the amount of vegetables and protein in your diet will help to support your body in losing weight and keeping it off. Make it a long-term lifestyle change, not a fad diet.

Here I will tell you how to lose weight and keep it off with my foods to eat and foods to avoid for weight loss:

How to Lose Weight and Keep It Off

Foods to avoid for weight loss:

  • Replace refined carbohydrates such as white bread, pasta and rice, pastries, pies, pizzas for whole grain brown bread, pasta and rice.
  • Avoid artificial sweeteners especially aspartame which puts a strain on the liver and can slow weight loss.
  • Reduce foods high in sugar, which converts to fat inside the body if it is not used up during exercise.
  • Avoid chocolates as they are highly acid-forming. The occasional piece of dark chocolate is fine.
  • Avoid all margarines, full-fat milk and full-fat cheeses.

 

Friendly foods for weight loss:

  • Eat more organic foods, which contain fewer pesticides. Pesticides are stored in fat tissue and are really hard to eliminate.
  • Increase fruit and vegetable consumption to 5-10 portions per day. Onions, ginger, spring greens, spinach, pak choy, celery, pineapple and apples are all great foods for assisting weight loss.
  • Eat at least 1 portion of good quality protein per day at breakfast or lunchtime such as beef, lamb, venison, fish, eggs, chicken or fermented tofu, as protein balances blood sugar for a longer period.
  • Always eat breakfast. A good option is  a couple of poached eggs on wholemeal toast or organic porridge made with almond milk and a few raisins to sweeten.
  • Drink lots of herbal teas and at least 6-8 glasses of water per day. Water suppresses the appetite and prevents fat depositing in the body.

 

Weight Loss Plate

Make your meal plate in these proportions for weight loss.

    • 10% protein e.g. chicken, fish, eggs
    • 20% good fats e.g. avocado, coconut oil, olive oil, nuts and seeds
    • 20% carbohydrates e.g. wholegrains, brown bread, brown pasta, brown rice
    • 50% fruits and vegetables

 

 

Weight Loss Meal Plan Ideas

When you calorie count it stresses you out and does not work in the long-term. Eat 3 meals per day and a few healthy snacks to give your body all the nutrients it needs.

Day 1

  • Breakfast porridge with 1 apple and raisins to sweeten.
  • Lunch tinned mackerel on 1 slice wholemeal toast.
  • Snack 1 sugar-free yoghurt.
  • Dinner chicken with roast potatoes, broccoli and cauliflower.

 

Day 2

  • Breakfast 2 poached eggs on 1 slice wholemeal toast.
  • Lunch Greek salad.
  • Snack 3 oatcakes with hummus or cottage cheese.
  • Dinner salmon with broccoli, cauliflower and quinoa.

 

Day 3

  • Breakfast sugar- free granola with almond milk and yoghurt.
  • Homemade vegetable soup with wholemeal bread
  • Snack handful of nuts and an apple or a pear.
  • Dinner chicken curry with spinach, tomato, cauliflower and brown rice.

If you would like a personalised diet plan for weight loss, contact Kate on 07652 868342 or info@kateoriordan.com for more information.

Top 10 Tips for Detoxing

It’s the new year! January is a great time to detox your body so that you are fresh as the new year begins. I have written these 10 steps as a guide to help you to achieve your new year’s resolution of detoxing. Here are my top 10 tips for detoxing including simple but effective ways to detox.

Top 1o Tips for Detoxing

  • Eat more organic food – reduce your exposure to toxic pesticides by eating organic as much as possible. When you consume pesticides, they are stored in your body as fat and are very difficult to eliminate.
  • Reduce processed foods that are high in sugar – when you eat sugar it converts to fat inside the body if not used up during exercise. Sugar is also highly acid and can cause inflammation in the body.
  • Avoid alcohol and caffeine – when you drink alcohol it poisons your body and puts the liver under stress to clear it from your body. If you consume caffeinated drinks such as coffee and black tea, it stimulates your adrenals depleting your body of nutrients. They also dehydrate the body. Avoid these body stressors and drink plenty of water to flush out toxins.
  • Drink plenty of water – Make sure you drink lots of herbal teas and at least 6-8 glasses of water per day. Water suppresses the appetite and prevents fat depositing in the body. It also reduces water retention and encourages toxins to be flushed through the body.
  • Green smoothies – you can pack your smoothie full of antioxidants and nutrients to help you detox. Try making a green smoothie with this recipe: handful of spinach, 1 apple, 1 banana, half an avocado, half a cucumber and 1 litre of water. This recipe make 2 500ml glasses of green smoothie.
  • Zeolite powder – zeolite is a powdered clay that has an affinity for binding to heavy metals such as lead, mercury and arsenic. It clasps to these toxic metals and flushes them out of your body.
  • Eat plenty of fruit and vegetables – increase your fruit and vegetable consumption to 5-10 portions per day to alkalise the body. Onions, ginger, spring greens, spinach, pak choy, celery, pineapple and apples are all great foods for detoxing. Radicchio, chicory, fennel, celeriac, rocket and bitter foods help to cleanse the liver, which aids detoxification.
  • Vegetarian diet – reduce your consumption of meat, dairy and other animal products which are acidic and mucus forming in the body. Increase your intake of vegetables, legumes and whole grains. When you are on a healthy vegetarian diet, you naturally lose weight and detoxify your body.
  • Exercise regularly – when you exercise regularly it improves your circulation which helps to move toxins out of the body.

 

I hope my top 10 tips for detoxing have inspired you to start cleansing your body. If you would like more information on detoxing, contact Kate on 07562 868342 for a free 15 minute nutrition consultation.