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Category Archive Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Tips for Recovering from ME/CFS

Around 250,000 people in Britain are recognised as having M.E or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). Many more are undiagnosed. I suffered with severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome for 3 years. It was after visiting a Nutritionist and following her plan for a few months that I began to get my energy back. After a year I was fully recovered and back working again. Below you can read my tips for recovering from ME/CFS.

Common Symptoms

  • Chronic, debilitating fatigue
  • Muscle pains
  • Headaches
  • Poor concentration
  • Low blood pressure
  • Insomnia
  • Sensitivity to light and noise
  • Constipation

Causes of Chronic Fatigue

  • Stress
  • Viral infections e.g. Glandular Fever or Cytomegalovirus.
  • Unprocessed emotional trauma
  • Exposure to a lot of electrical equipment (EMR)
  • Have running water under your home (Geopathic stress)
  • Polio vaccination
  • Low blood sugar level
  • Heavy metal toxicity
  • Liver congestion
  • Food intolerances
  • Candida overgrowth
  • Parasites
  • Adrenal fatigue
  • Deficiencies of minerals e.g. magnesium

Tips for Recovering from ME/CFS

Foods to Avoid

  • Avoid any foods and drinks containing caffeine, sugar and alcohol, all of which lower the immune function, weaken the adrenal system and cause imbalance with blood sugar levels.
  • Most mass produced, tinned foods and takeaways are lacking in magnesium. Most M.E patients have low levels if this vital mineral.
  • Avoid energy drinks such as Red Bull which contain caffeine which will only serve to weaken you in the long term.
  • If you find yourself constantly craving foods such as wheat, sugar and snacks, are bloated, have an urgency to urinate, suffer mood swings and are always tired, you may well have Candida overgrowth. Follow the anti-candida diet.
  • Almost everyone with chronic fatigue will have multiple food intolerances, the most common being to wheat and cow’s milk.

Foods to Eat

  • Essential fats are vital for people with M.E since they support the endocrine system, boost immunity and help to balance blood sugar. Therefore eat more pumpkin seeds, flaxseeds, walnuts and oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, anchovies, sardines and herring.
  • It is vital that you eat good-quality protein such as organic meat, chicken, fresh fish, beans or lentils at least twice a day. Protein boosts the immune system and helps to balance blood sugar for longer periods.
  • Eat plenty of wholegrain cereals, leafy green vegetables such as cabbage, kale, spring greens, pak choy, broccoli, and brazil nuts, walnuts, almonds, curries, black strap molasses and beans which are all rich in magnesium.
  • Replace wheat with amaranth, buckwheat, quinoa, millet, brown rice, oats and wheat free bread.
  • Drink at least 2 litres of filtered water daily to help detoxify your system.

Lifestyle Tips

  • Do some gentle exercise such a pilates stretches to gradually tone the muscles and help to drain the lymph system which is often overloaded.
  • Learn to relax. Meditation is a great way to give the body and brain a complete rest. Try listening to relaxing music such as sounds of nature.
  • Have a massage to drain the lymph system and soothe aching muscles.
  • Look into ozone therapy to oxygenate the body.
  • Many people have been cured of M.E by energy healers.
  • If you symptoms persist, try having your house dowsed for electrical and geopathic stress. To find a dowser contact The British Dowsing Society.
  • Visit a counsellor as many people discover that their ME/CFS was triggered by an emotional trauma and speaking about it helps you to process it.

Recommended Testing

  • I would recommend hair mineral analysis testing for ME/CFS. This test can show you if you have adrenal fatigue, thyroid problems, blood sugar imbalances and the levels of toxic metals in your body. It can also show you the levels of minerals such as magnesium, calcium and zinc in your cells.
  • Also I would recommend doing a food intolerance blood test to check for sensitivities to wheat, cow’s milk and other foods. Alternatively you can find a practitioner who uses a bio-feedback machine to test for food intolerances as well as for the presence of viruses and Candida.

Furthermore if you would like to learn more nutrition tips for recovering from ME/CFS, contact Kate and book your free 15 minute fatigue breakthrough call!

Nutrition for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Having experienced myself what it is like to go through Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), I know how important nutrition is for recovering health. I have gained a wealth of knowledge on my nutrition course to support CFS. Below I have listed my nutrition for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome tips:

Magnesium

If you have CFS you may have aches and pains in your muscles after minor exertion. When you take magnesium it can help to relieve muscular pains and it is know as nature’s tranquilliser. Good sources of magnesium include dark green leafy vegetables, dark chocolate and nuts and seeds.

Filtered water

People with CFS often have a lot of toxins in their body. Drinking at least 2 litres of filtered water every day helps to flush out the toxins and keep you hydrated. Having a water filter clears the water of toxic chemicals, as well as chlorine and fluoride which can harm the thyroid gland.

Protein

The average adult needs to eat 2-3 portions of protein per day or their weight in kilos x 0.8. If you are ill with CFS you need to eat an extra portion of protein to support you body building immune cells and for tissue repair. People with CFS need to eat an amount of protein in grams equal to their weight in kilos x 1. For example 50kg x 1 = 50g of protein per day. Good sources of protein include meat, chicken, fish, eggs and tofu.

Zinc

Often people with CFS have multiple viruses and infections that the body is constantly trying to fight off. This can deplete the immune system of the vital nutrient zinc. When you take zinc it boosts the immune system. Good sources of zinc include fish, seafood and pumpkin seeds.

Vitamin C

People with CFS often are inflammatory and have lots of free radical damage from their immune cells constantly fighting infections. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that helps to mop up free radicals and prevent cell damage.

Omega 3

You need omega 3 fatty acids for brain health and concentration, skin health and tight cell membranes. You can find omega 3 in oily fish such as salmon, mackerel and sardines, walnuts, hemp powder, flaxseed and chia seeds. Often people with CFS are deficient in omega 3 so it may be worth increasing it in the diet and taking a supplement to see if you feel better.

If you would like to find out more about how to use nutrition to support CFS/ME recovery, please contact me to book your free 15 minute fatigue breakthrough call.