Tag Archive Diet

Diet for IBS

If you are suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), you may be thinking “what can I eat for IBS?”Below I describe the best diet for IBS.

IBS is an umbrella term used to describe a set of symptoms. There are 2 types of IBS:

  • Spastic colon-type IBS – where gripping pain is common and alternating constipation and diarrhoea.
  • Painless diarrhoea-type IBS – there is urgent diarrhoea usually upon rising and often after a meal.

Common Symptoms

  • Abdominal pain
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhoea
  • Bloating
  • Flatulence
  • Headaches
  • Cramps
  • Nausea
  • Anxiety
  • Depression

Causes

  • Food intolerances – most commonly to wheat, dairy, coffee, tea and citrus fruits. Although an intolerance can be present to any unsuspecting food.
  • Stress – your digestion shuts down during periods of stress leading to a lack of digestive enzymes and stomach acid. This can lead to incompletely digested food irritating the gut.
  • Parasites – 49% of people with IBS are known to have the parasite Blastocystis hominis. And 20% of people with IBS have the parasite Dientamoeba fragilis.
  • Gut dysbiosis – an imbalance of the good and bad bacteria present in your gut and/or overgrowth of Candida.. This can be triggered by a poor diet that has insufficient fibre, and is high in alcohol, fatty fats and sugar. Also taking antibiotics will upset this balance.
  • Other diseases – occasionally the symptoms of IBS can be mistaken for a more serious underlying condition such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis or diverticulitis. So it is very important to go and see your doctor.

Diet for IBS

Foods to Avoid for IBS

  • Refined wheat – is high in gluten, which can be irritating to the gut and is usually the biggest factor in IBS.
  • Cow’s milk – comes next.
  • Flour – from any sources gunks up the bowel in sensitive individuals.
  • Eggs,
  • Citrus fruits – especially oranges
  • High tyramine foods – such as cheese, port, red wine, sherry, beef, liver, herring, sauerkraut and yeast extracts.
  • Melted cheese – is very hard for the body to digest. Avoid at all costs.
  • Refined foods – such as white rice, pasta, cakes, pastries, alcohol, fried fodds, high-sugar foods and those foods high in saturated animal fat found in meat and dairy all deplete good bacteria in the gut and help feed the bad guys.

Foods to Eat for IBS

  • There are plenty of alternatives to wheat e.g. wheat-free bread, amaranth, spelt, millet, buckwheat, quinoa, oat and rye crisp breads, and rice and corn cakes, which are delicious.
  • You can now buy lentil-, corn-, rice- and potato-based pastas.
  • Try organic rice,almond or oat milk , or try goat’s or sheep’s milk instead of cow’s milk.
  • Eat more brown rice which is cleansing and healing to the digestive tract. As well as potatoes, fish, lean poultry, fruits and vegetables.
  • Peppermint, fennel, chamomile and rosemary teas can enhance digestion and ease discomfort.
  • Instead of orange juice, try low-sugar diluted apple, pear or pineapple juice.

Also the FODMAP diet can help with IBS.

References:

  • Courteney, H. (2008). 500 of the Most Important Health Tips You’ll Ever Need. 3rd edn. London: CICO Books. pp. 212-214

 

For more information on diet for IBS, contact Kate to book a consultation today.

The Low FODMAP Diet

The low FODMAP diet is a 7 to 10 day treatment that is often effective for:

  • IBS
  • SIBO
  • Certain auto-immune conditions/diseases like (potentially) rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis or eczema
  • Fibromyalgia or other health issues that are triggered by certain foods
  • Frequent migraines that appear to be triggered after certain meals

The low-FODMAP diet is thought to work by reducing fermentation in the gut. Fermentation happens when naturally-occurring gut bacteria break down certain foods, and produce gases such as carbon dioxide, hydrogen and methane as by-products. In people who are susceptible, this fermentation process can trigger uncomfortable gut symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhoea and constipation.

It is less restrictive than the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD).

FODMAP is an acronym for:

  • Fermentable – fermentable foods (e.g., prebiotics)
  • Oligosaccharides – Beans and various vegetables.
  • Disaccharides – e.g., sucrose, lactose, etc.
  • Monosaccharides – primarily fructose
  • And
  • Polyols – these are sugar alcohols often used as sweeteners. Some examples are xylitol, maltitol, and erythritol

 

Foods to Eat on The Low FODMAP Diet

  • Meats, Poultry, Eggs, Fish: Chicken, fish, eggs, pork, shellfish, turkey, beef, lamb, all other meats
  • Vegetables: Cucumbers, carrots, celery, eggplant, lettuce, leafy greens, pumpkin, potatoes, squash, yams, tomatoes, zucchini, bamboo shoots, bell peppers, bok choy, bean sprouts, collards, spaghetti squash, olives, green beans, rutabaga, spinach, ginger root, radish, turnips, corn, mushrooms
  • Fruit (limit to one serving daily): Bananas, berries, cantaloupe, grapes, honeydew, grapefruit, kiwi, lemon, lime, orange, pineapple, rhubarb, passion fruit, kiwifruit, dragon fruit, papaya
  • Dairy products (low lactose): Lactose free dairy, half and half, lactose free cream cheese, lactose free cottage, cheddar, parmesan, fermented yoghurt, dark chocolate
  • Non-dairy alternatives: Almond milk, rice milk, nuts, nut butters, seeds, hemp milk
  • Grains (wheat free): Wheat free grains and flours without a ton of fibre: breads, noodles, pasta, waffles, tortillas, pancakes, quinoa, rice, cream of rice, oats, sourdough bread, soba noodles
  • Beverages: Coffee, tea, gin, vodka, wine, whiskey
  • Seasonings/Condiments: Basil, cilantro, coriander, lemongrass, parsley, mint, sage, thyme, homemade bone broth, chives, flaxseed, margarine, mayonnaise, olive oil, pepper, salt, sugar, mustard, vinegar, balsamic vinegar, pure maple syrup, vanilla

The Low FODMAP Diet Excludes the following foods:

  • Vegetables: Artichokes, asparagus, broccoli, beetroot, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, garlic, fennel, leaks, mushrooms, okra, onions, peas, shallots.
  • Fruit: Apples, applesauce, apricots, blackberries, boysenberries, cherries, canned fruit, dates, dried fruits, figs, guava, mango, nectarines, pears, peaches, plums, prunes, watermelon.
  • Dairy products: Milk (from cows, goats and sheep), ice cream, most yogurts, sour cream, whipped cream, custard, soft and fresh cheeses (cottage, ricotta, etc).
  • Non-dairy alternatives: Coconut cream, beans, hummus, pistachios, soy products, coconut milk, black eyed peas, fava beans, kidney beans
  • Legumes: Beans, chickpeas, lentils, red kidney beans, baked beans, soybeans.
  • Grains: wheat, barley, rye, bread, pasta, most breakfast cereals, tortillas, waffles, pancakes, crackers, biscuits.
  • Beverages: Beer, rum, fortified wines, soft drinks with high fructose corn syrup, milk, soy milk, fruit juices.
  • Sweeteners: Fructose, honey, high fructose corn syrup, xylitol, mannitol, maltitol, sorbitol.

Following the low FODMAP diet is a short-term treatment to reduce symptoms of IBS and SIBO. A lot of the excluded foods are very beneficial for feeding the good bacteria in your gut such as the vegetables, fruits and legumes. Also dairy products can boost levels of the good bacteria lactobacillus in the gut. Therefore I would not recommend continuing the diet in the long-term.

 

 

For more information on the low FODMAP diet, contact Kate for a free 15 minute discovery call.

 

References: 

https://www.ihcanconferences.co.uk/digestive-enzymes-clinical-considerations-in-ibs-sibo-dysbiosis-and-the-leaky-gu

https://www.bupa.co.uk/newsroom/ourviews/fodmap-diet-for-ibs

https://sibosurvivor.com/sibo-die

Nutrients for Underactive Thyroid

The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in your neck that releases hormones. Thyroid hormones help your body regulate a few things – not a big deal – just the metabolism of ALL cells. And this is critical for having the energy to live your life.

(Yes, your thyroid IS a big deal!)

Furthermore it’s estimated that at least 3.7% of UK adults have an underactive thyroid.

When you don’t have enough thyroid hormone, you have what’s called hypothyroidism. This can result in the slowing down of your metabolism and chronic fatigue. Some of the other symptoms can include weight gain, forgetfulness, dry hair and skin, constipation and feeling cold.

You can get a diagnosis of underactive thyroid from a blood test from your health professional.

How does the thyroid become underactive?

There are many reasons why your thyroid may become underactive. The most common is autoimmunity, where the immune cells attack other cells in the body. In this case, the cells of the thyroid gland.

It can also be the result of low levels of iodine, which is an essential mineral.

Below I explain about nutrients for underactive thyroid.

Nutrients for underactive thyroid

Enough iodine from food – you will find iodine naturally in fish and seafood. Other foods that contain iodine are navy beans, potatoes, and eggs. Sometimes levels of natural iodine depend on the amount of iodine in the soil. Also you will find that iodine is also added (i.e., fortified) to some foods.

Enough selenium from food – selenium is another essential mineral to support the thyroid. Selenium-rich foods include Brazil nuts, mushrooms, meat, and fish.

Enough protein – One of the common symptoms of thyroid issues is fatigue. If this is the case, one thing you can eat more of is protein. Protein keeps you feeling full for longer and has plenty of B vitamins to support your adrenals and energy production.

Gluten-free – Try going gluten-free. There is evidence of a link between underactive thyroid and gluten sensitivity. There may be a “cross-reactivity” where the immune cells that are sensitised to gluten can attack the thyroid cells by mistake. This is essentially how autoimmunity works and can affect more than just your thyroid. Also you could request to get tested for coeliac disease if you are experiencing thyroid issues.

Lifestyle upgrade – additionally tiredness and fatigue are very common when it comes to thyroid issues. In this case, it’s important to get enough quality sleep and reduce stress.

Conclusion

If you have concerns about your thyroid, then ask to be tested. That along with asking for testing for coeliac disease can help to confirm your best plan to move forward in good health.

Foods to support your thyroid include iodine- and selenium-containing foods and gluten-free foods. Don’t forget to eat enough protein to help boost your metabolism.

If you want to supplement with iodine, you should work with a qualified health professional.

Also regular exercise, quality sleep, and stress-reduction are all part of the holistic approach to supporting your thyroid.

Do you or someone you know have concerns about your thyroid? What diet and lifestyle factors have you got the most benefit from? Let me know by commenting below.

Contact

Finally for more information on using nutrition to support your thyroid, contact Kate for a free 15 minute phone consultation.

References:

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/all-about-thyroid

https://www.dietvsdisease.org/the-best-diet-for-an-underactive-thyroid/

http://www.who.int/elena/titles/iodine_pregnancy/en/

https://www.dietvsdisease.org/meal-plan-for-hypothyroidism-and-weight-loss/

https://www.dietvsdisease.org/meal-plan-for-hypothyroidism-and-weight-loss-week-2/

Nutrition for Supporting the Adrenal Glands

With the stressful pace of modern living in the West, the adrenal glands can struggle to keep up! Your adrenal glands secrete adrenaline and other stress hormones to help you to cope with stress. When you are feeling exhausted, your adrenals give you the energy to keep going!

With constant stress, your adrenals are continuously being stimulated until they crash. This is when you can experience adrenal fatigue.

Symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue include:

  • Unable to get out of bed in the morning
  • Feeling constantly exhausted
  • Craving salty foods
  • Feel wired in the evening and unable to sleep.

People with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS/ME) often have adrenal fatigue leaving them bed bound.

So how can you use nutrition for supporting the adrenal glands?

Nutrition for Supporting the Adrenal Glands:

  • Vitamin C – boosts your adrenal glands
  • B vitamins – give you energy and help your adrenals to keep going.
  • Himalayan Pink Salt – salt supports your adrenal glands. Also Himalayan pink salt is rich in other minerals to support your adrenals. Add a pinch of this salt to all your meals.
  • Potassium – is another mineral that boosts your adrenal glands. Also it balances the sodium:potassium ratio in your cells to allow more nutrients into the cells. You can get potassium from foods including bananas, mangoes, spinach, sweet potato, acorn squash and coconut water.
  • Ashwaganda – is a herb to that helps you adapt to stress.

Foods to Avoid for Adrenal Fatigue:

  • Caffeinated foods and drinks – such as tea, coffee and chocolate all drive your adrenals to exhaustion and are best avoided.
  • Sugary foods – such as cakes, biscuits and sweets all spike your blood sugar and soon after you crash as your blood sugar drops. This puts a strain on your adrenal glands.

For more information on using nutrition for supporting your adrenal glands, contact Kate for a free 15 minute phone chat.

 

Which Diet is Better For CFS Recovery?

Which diet is better for CFS recovery? Is a vegetarian or stone-age diet better when recovering from CFS? There are so many diets out there, how do you know which one is right for you?

Everybody is unique and no one diet fits all. Some people have food intolerances or allergies to certain foods.

My Story

When I was recovering from my CFS, I was eating meats such as lamb, pork and also fish such as rainbow trout or seabass 2-3x per week. I was also eating carbs such as gluten-free bread, wild rice, gluten-free pasta and dried apricots. I ate plenty of broccoli, peas and carrots. So I was on a moderate protein, moderate carbohydrate, low refined sugar diet.

When I visited a Nutritionist, she detected that I had intolerances to beef, sugar, yeast and cow’s milk. So being an all-or-nothing kind of person, I immediately cut out these foods. Within a few weeks I felt a lot better. After 5 months of following her nutrition and supplement plan I had my energy back.  Basically she put me on an anti-candida diet as my body was overrun with Candida and my immune system was weak.

Benefits of a Stone-Age Diet for CFS Recovery

A stone-age diet is high in meat and animal protein, low in carbohydrates and high in fat. Dr Myhill recommends a stone-age/paleo diet for people with CFS, as meat is rich in amino acids and protein which boost the immune system and heal tissue damage in the body. People with blood type O do better on a stone-age diet as they have high levels of stomach acid and can easily digest meat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Benefits of a Vegetarian Diet for CFS Recovery

A vegetarian diet done correctly is full of vegetables, lentils, legumes and beans and is rich in nutrients and anti-oxidants. People with blood type A do better on a vegetarian diet, possibly with some fish. For people who have low stomach acid and find meat difficult to digest, or those on PPIs such as omeprazole or lansoprazole which block stomach acid production, may do better on a vegetarian diet. Also meat can be constipating so eliminating meat eases constipation and improves your detoxification abilities.

Conclusion

So which diet is better for CFS recovery? Personally I would recommend a low sugar, anti-candida diet for healing CFS. Avoiding refined sugar, sugary fruits like bananas, grapes and dried fruits, also avoiding yeast found in bread, mushrooms, fermented foods, cheese, peanuts and cashew nuts.

Also you need to avoid your food intolerances which deplete your body’s energy. The most common food intolerances are to gluten (found in wheat, rye, barley and rolled oats) and cow’s milk.

You need to eat plenty of protein when recovering from CFS to boost your immune system and to heal tissue damage. So a Stone-age diet is very beneficial. If you are vegetarian and can’t face eating meat, I would recommend a high protein vegetarian diet eating plenty of beans, chickpeas, lentils, non-GMO tofu and eggs.

If you don’t eat oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, anchovies, sardines or herring regularly, which I didn’t when recovering from my CFS, you need to take an omega 3 supplement e.g. a fish oil or a vegan algal omega 3 supplement. I took igennus Vegepa supplement.

For more information on Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS), contact Kate on 07562 868342 or info@kateoriordan.com for a free 15 minute chat.

How Much Protein Do I Need?

Protein is not just for great skin, hair, and nails; it’s critical for health. Without it, you wouldn’t be able to repair damage, digest food, fight infections, build muscle and bone, create hormones, and even think and have good moods. Higher protein diets can help fight high blood pressure, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Not to mention protein’s great benefits for metabolism boosting, satiety (feeling full after a meal), and weight management.

Protein is important, and this is a given.

There are a few factors to consider when calculating how much protein we need. I go through those calculations with you. Then I list the amount of protein in some common foods.

How much protein do I need?

There isn’t a real rule that applies equally to everyone. There are a few factors to consider when figuring out how much protein you need.

Start with the minimum recommendation of 0.8 g/kg (0.36 g/lb) per day.

So, for a 68 kg (150 lb) healthy non-athlete adult, this is about 55 g protein/day.

Mind you, this is a minimum to prevent protein deficiency. It’s not optimal for good repair, digestion, immune function, muscle/bone building, hormones, thinking and great moods. It’s not enough for athletes, the elderly, or those recovering from an injury, or an illness such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, either. If you fall into one of these camps, you may need to increase the minimum protein intake. Aim closer to 1.3 g/kg (0.6 g/lb) per day.

Athletes need more protein for their energy and muscle mass. Seniors need more to help ward off muscle and bone loss that’s common in old age. And injured people need more for recovery and healing.

How much protein is too much?

As with fat and carbohydrates, eating too much protein can cause weight gain. Extra protein can be converted into sugar or fat in the body. The interesting thing about protein is that it isn’t as easily or quickly converted as carbohydrates or fat; this is because of its “thermic effect.” The thermic effect is the amount of energy required to digest, absorb, transport and store a nutrient. To digest protein, your body needs to spend energy (i.e., burn calories). More calories than when metabolising fats or carbohydrates.

If you’re concerned that high protein intake harms healthy kidneys, don’t be. If your kidneys are healthy, they are more than capable of filtering out excess amino acids from the blood. The problem only occurs in people who already have kidney issues.

FUN FACT: Plant proteins are especially safe for kidney health.

How much protein is in food?

  • A 3.5 oz chicken breast has 31 g protein.
  • A 3.5 oz salmon has 20 g protein.
  • ½ cup cooked beans contain 6-9 g protein.
  • A large egg contains 6 g protein.
  • ¼ cup nuts contains 4-7 g protein.
  • 1 medium baked potato contains 3 g protein.

Conclusion

Protein is an essential nutrient we should all get enough of. How much protein do I need? “Enough” is about 0.8 – 1.3 g/kg (0.36 – 0.6 g/lb) per day. If you’re a healthy non-athlete adult, you can aim for the lower level. If you’re an athlete, senior, or injured person, aim for the higher level.

Too much protein can cause weight gain, so it’s best to have just enough.

I’d love to know: Are you one of those people who needs more protein? Leave a comment and let me know.

Recipe (high-protein): Baked Chicken Breasts

Serves 4

Ingredients

4 boneless skinless chicken breasts
1 tbsp olive oil
1 clove garlic
1/4 tsp sea salt
½ tsp black pepper
½ tsp paprika

Instructions

Preheat oven to 450°F. Place a layer of parchment paper on a baking dish.

Place the chicken breasts in the prepared dish. Brush on both sides with olive oil.
In a small bowl, mix spices until combined. Sprinkle the spice mixture evenly over the chicken on both sides.

Bake for 15-20 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through to at least 165°F at the thickest part.
Serve & enjoy!

Tip: Serve with lots of veggies.

For more information about protein or if you are interested in purchasing my high protein vegetarian or non-vegetarian meal plan, contact Kate on 07562868342 or send a message in the contact form below! I would love to hear from you.

Mood Boosting Foods

No question that what you eat can affect how you feel, right?

Mental health and brain health are complex. So are the foods we eat, and the ways our bodies interact with those foods. While, we don’t know the exact mechanisms how food and nutrition help, we know a few ways food impacts our moods.

First, what we eat becomes the raw materials for our neurotransmitters. “Neurotransmitters” are biochemical messengers that allow our nerve cells to communicate (ever heard of serotonin?). They are important not just for thinking and memory, but also for mental health.

Second, what we eat affects our blood sugar. And having unstable blood sugar levels can contribute to mood swings.

Let’s talk about mood-boosting and mood boosting foods.

Mood boosting foods

Some nutrient deficiencies look like mental health problems; this includes deficiencies in B-vitamins, vitamin D, and the mineral selenium. So, getting enough vitamins, minerals, (and other things like antioxidants) are key. These nutrients not only reduce inflammation but also fuel the biochemical reactions in our bodies. Including those that create neurotransmitters. So make sure you’re eating a variety of nutrient-dense whole foods, especially fresh fruits and vegetables. In fact, studies show that people who eat the most fruits and vegetables are the happiest.

Also pay special attention to vitamin D (the sunshine vitamin), as it’s not naturally occurring in too many foods. Selenium is an essential mineral found in Brazil nuts, walnuts, cod, and poultry. Try to add some of those to your weekly diet.

Second, make sure you get enough protein. Protein is your body’s main supply of amino acids. Amino acids are very important for mood issues because they are the building blocks of neurotransmitters. Protein also helps to regulate blood sugar. I recommend eating protein with every meal; this includes dark green leafy vegetables, eggs, poultry, and meat.

Third, complex carbohydrates like sweet potato and quinoa are great too. They allow better absorption of key amino acids like tryptophan. Tryptophan is used by your body to make serotonin (your “happy hormone”) and melatonin (your “sleepy” hormone). So, if you want to relax, try these in the evening.

Fourth, fish and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids (nuts, seeds, and algae) are also mood-boosting. Omega-3s are definitely “brain food” and may help to ease some symptoms.

FUN FACT: One study showed that giving one multi-vitamin and one omega-3 fish oil tablet per day to prison inmates reduced the incidence of violent behaviour by 50%!

Last but not least, make sure you’re hydrated. Mild dehydration can cause mood issues as well.

 

Mood Busting Foods

You won’t be surprised to hear me say processed foods are mood-busters, right? One study suggests that eating a lot of processed foods devoid of nutrients can increase your chances of becoming depressed by as much as 60 percent! This is on top of the research that shows nutrient deficiencies can look like mental health problems.

“But it makes me feel good!”

Yes, some of these mood busters can make you feel better temporarily. Some big food companies study how to maximise the “pleasure” centres with the perfect amount of sugar, salt, and fat. Not to mention the colour, texture, and taste; they can light up our taste buds and make us feel good… for now.

A few other things to avoid are:

  • Alcohol (nervous system depressant)
  • Caffeine (may worsen anxious feelings and ability to sleep)
  • Sugar (messes with your blood sugar and can worsen inflammation).

Conclusion

Bad moods can lead to bad eating habits; and, bad eating habits can lead to bad moods. If you need a mood boost, stick to minimally processed nutrient-dense whole foods. Things like fresh fruit and vegetables (including leafy greens), nuts and seeds, eggs, fish, poultry, and meat. Avoid common mood-busting foods like alcohol, caffeine, and sugar.

And remember, sometimes “feel good” junk foods, only make you feel good temporarily. So, try my newest recipe for fruit salad, below.

Recipe (Mood Boosting): Fruit Salad

Serves 3-4

Ingredients

300g watermelon, cubed
300g cantaloupe melon, cubed
150g blueberries, fresh
150g blackberries, fresh
300g green grapes

Instructions

Place all fruit in a large bowl and gently toss.

Serve and enjoy!

Tip: Substitute or add any ready-to-eat fruit, like chopped peaches, or raspberries.

 

For more information on mood boosting foods, contact Kate for a free 15 minute consultation!

Best Foods to Eat for Healing ME/CFS

Nutrition is a powerful allie when recovering from ME/CFS. A question I get asked a lot as a Nutritionist is “What should I eat?” In this article I will explain the best foods to eat for healing ME/CFS.

Firstly, let me tell you what I ate when I was ill with my Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

 

My Story

Step 1: Junk Food

When I was a university student living away from home and first became ill with ME/CFS I used to eat a diet of junk food such as:

  • Microwave ready meal lasagne.
  • Pasta in creamy sauce
  • Beef burgers
  • Microwave ready meal salmon and broccoli in creamy sauce.
  • Microwave chips and fish fingers.
  • Pop tarts
  • Sugary Cereal
  • Pizza
  • Prawn mayonnaise sandwiches
  • Baked potato with tuna mayonnaise
  • Chocolate bars

By eating all these junk foods in excess I destroyed my health.

I now know that when you microwave meals it denatures the structure of the food so it is not the same food that went into the microwave!

Step 2: Gluten-Free in Recovery

After a positive Coeliac IgA blood test result from my Doctor in May 2009 I removed wheat from my diet and cooked things such as:

  • Rainbow trout with wild rice, steamed broccoli and carrots.
  • Sea bass with gluten-free pasta and steamed vegetables in a creamy sauce.
  • Sausages, wild rice and steamed vegetables.
  • Gluten-free pasta in tomato sauce.
  • Steamed egg ramekin.
  • Gluten-free sandwiches
  • Rice pudding
  • Oat porridge with blueberries
  • Spaghetti Bolognese with gluten-free pasta
  • Oat flapjacks
  • Gluten-free pasta bake
  • Fish pie
  • Homemade pork burgers
  • Lamb shanks

These are the foods that I was eating during my recovery from 2010-2011. then helped me to regain my health.

Based on what I have learnt in my 3 year nutrition course, the best foods to eat for healing ME/CFS are:

  • Rainbow trout – high in CoQ10, a nutrient which helps to get energy into cells. It is also high in protein and vitamin D to boost the immune system.
  • Walnuts – also high in omega 3 and good fats.
  • Free-range eggs – a good source of protein and vitamin D to boost the immune system.
  • Blueberries – an antioxidant to protect your body from free-radical damage while it is fighting off viruses and Candida.
  • Broccoli – a good source of CoQ10, vitamin C and it supports the sulphation detoxification pathway in your liver.

 

If you would like to find out more about diet for healing ME/CFS, contact Kate here.

How to Kill Recurrent Candida

When you have recurrent Candida it can be very difficult to get rid of! You may have tried multiple courses of antibiotics which work for a short time and then the Candida comes back with avengence! Below I explain how to kill recurrent Candida.

 

 

You may have horrible symptoms including:

  • Yellow vaginal discharge
  • Constant fatigue
  • Brain fog
  • Need to go to bed at 7pm.
  • Unable to get out of the house and socialise with friends due to exhaustion.
  • Thick white coating on your tongue.

So what can you do?

Well you need to treat the root cause of the problem which is poor diet. Your diet may be high in sugary, processed foods which are feeding the Candida.

How to Kill Recurrent Candida

Step 1

Remove refined sugar from your diet and replace it with low sugar fruits such as apples, pears, strawberries, blueberries and kiwis. When you stop feeding the Candida it will start to starve and die off. You may have sugar cravings for a few days during the die off period. Check out my post on anti-candida diet for ideas on what foods to eat to kill Candida.

Step 2

You need to boost your immune system to help your body to fight off the Candida. Eat more zinc rich foods such as fish and seafood to power your immune system. Also eating foods high in vitamin C, which is a powerful antioxidant, protects the body during the die off period when Candida release harmful toxins. You can eat more oranges, spinach and tomatoes to get your dose of vitamin C.

Step 3

Drink at least 2 litres of filtered water daily to help flush out toxins during the die off period. It also helps you to stay hydrated so your body can function more efficiently.

Step 4

Eat natural anti-fungals including raw garlic, onion and coconut oil. These work gently to kill off the Candida without destroying all the good bacteria in your gut.

If you want more tips on how to kill candida, download my free guide here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contact Me

You can also contact me on 07562 868342 for your free 15 minute consultation! Or you can message me in the contact form below.

Natural Remedies to Relieve PMS

When you have pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) you may have symptoms including mood swings, anxiety, depression, breast tenderness, migraines and cramps. You get these symptoms in the week leading up to the start of your period. You may feel very uncomfortable and find it difficult to go about your day to day activities. Below I talk about natural remedies to relieve PMS.

Many women’s period cycles are in time with the 28 day cycles of the moon.

Here are my natural remedies to relieve PMS and the 4 types of PMS:

  • PMS A (Anxiety) – you may get anxiety, tension, anger and irritability with this type of PMS. It is the most common type of PMS.
  • PMS D (Depresssion) – people with this type of PMS get severe depression, tearfulness and withdrawal that can affect their everyday live. They may even feel suicidal. It is caused by low levels of the hormone progesterone and high levels of oestrogen. You need to eat more phytoestrogen containing foods such a flaxseed/linseed and fermented soya. When you eat phytoestrogens, these food block the oestrogen receptor sites in the body causing a weaker oestrogen effect.
  • PMS H (Hyperhydration) – you may get water retention, swelling, bloating, weight gain and breast tenderness with this hydration type of PMS. You need to avoid eating too much salt which increases the swelling.
  • PMS C (Cravings) – you can get strong cravings for sugar snacks and chocolate with this type of PMS. Also you may get blood sugar imbalance, headaches and fatigue.

Most women experience a different type of PMS before each period.

Natural remedies to relieve PMS including herbs:

  • Agnus castus – when you take this herb it stimulates your pituitary gland to balance the secretions of all of your hormones. It is very effective for relieving PMS and needs to taking everyday for 3 months.
  • Black cohosh – taking this herb can relieve symptoms of PMS A including anxiety and tension as well as headaches and migraines.
  • Milk thistle – helps to support your liver in detoxifying excess oestrogen and other hormones.

Caution – do not take these herbs if you are on the pill, on HRT or pregnant.

Furthermore if you would like to learn more nutrition tips for relieving PMS, contact Kate on 07562 868342 for a free 15 minute consultation!

 

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