Tag Archive Nutrition

How to Read Nutrition Facts Tables

The Nutrition Facts table is on the side of most packaged foods. It’s often found close to the ingredient listing.

The purpose of it is to help consumers make better nutrition decisions. When people can see the number of calories, carbs, sodium, etc. in food, they should be able to eat better, right?

Whether you like the Nutrition Facts table or not, let’s make sure you get the most out of it, since it’s here to stay!

Here’s my four-step crash course on how to read the Nutrition Facts table.

Step 1: Serving Size

 The absolute most important part of the Nutrition Facts table is to note the serving size. Manufacturers often strategically choose the serving size to make the rest of the table look good. Small serving = small calories/fat/carbs. So, it’s tricky.

All the information in the table rests on the amount chosen as the serving size. And, since every manufacturer chooses their own, it’s often difficult to compare two products.

In Canada, in the next few years (between 2017-2022), serving sizes will be more consistent between similar foods. This will make it easier to compare foods. The new labels will also have more realistic serving sizes to reflect the amount that people eat in one sitting, and not be artificially small.

Let’s use an example – plain, unsalted walnuts.

As you can see, right under the Nutrition Facts header is the serving size. That is a ¼ cup or 28 g. This means that all the numbers underneath it are based on this amount.

FUN EXPERIMENT: Try using a measuring cup to see exactly how much of a certain food equals one serving. You may be surprised at how small it is (imagine a ¼ cup of walnuts).

Step 2: % Daily Value

The % Daily Value (%DV) is based on the recommended daily amount of each nutrient the average adult needs. Ideally, you will get 100% DV for each nutrient every day. This is added up based on all of the foods and drinks you have throughout the day.

NOTE: Since children are smaller and have different nutritional needs if a type of food is intended solely for children under the age of 4, then those foods use a child’s average nutrition needs for the %DV.

The %DV is a guideline, not a rigid rule.

You don’t need to add all of your %DV up for everything you eat all day. Instead, think of anything 5% or less to be a little; and, anything 15% or more to be a lot.

NOTE: Not every nutrient has a %DV. You can see it’s missing for things like cholesterol, sugar, and protein. This is because there isn’t an agreed “official” %DV for that nutrient. The good news is that the new Nutrition Facts tables will include a %DV for sugar. Keep your eyes out for that.

Step 3: Middle of the table (e.g. Calories, fat, cholesterol, sodium, potassium, carbohydrates, and protein)

Calories are pretty straight forward. Here, a ¼ cup (28 g) of walnuts has 190 calories.

Fat is in bold for a reason. That 1 g of fat (29% DV) is total fat. That includes the non-bold items underneath it. Here, 19 g of total fat includes 1.5 g saturated fat, (19 g – 1.5 g = 17.5 g) unsaturated fat, and 0 g trans fat. (Yes, unsaturated fats including mono- and poly-unsaturated are not on the label, so you need to do a quick subtraction).

Cholesterol, sodium, and potassium are all measured in mg. Ideally, aim for around 100% of potassium and sodium each day. It’s easy to overdo sodium, especially if you grab pre-made, restaurant foods, or snacks. Keep an eye on this number if sodium can be a problem for you (e.g. if your doctor mentioned it, if you have high blood pressure or kidney problems, etc.).

Carbohydrate, like fat, is in bold because it is total carbohydrates. It includes the non-bold items underneath it like fibre, sugar, and starch (not shown). Here, 30 g of walnuts contain 4 g of carbohydrates; that 2 g are all fibre. There is no sugar or starch. And as you can see, 2 g of giber is 8% of your daily value for fibre.

Proteins, like calories, are pretty straight forward as well. Here, a ¼ cup (28 g) of walnuts contains 4 g of protein.

Step 4: Bottom of the table (e.g. vitamins & minerals)

The vitamins and minerals listed at the bottom of the table are also straightforward. The new labels will list potassium, calcium, and iron. Yes, potassium will drop from the middle of the table to the bottom, and both vitamins A & C will become optional.

Manufacturers can add other vitamins and minerals to the bottom of their Nutrition Facts table (this is optional). And you’ll notice that some foods contain a lot more vitamins and minerals than others do.

Conclusion

I hope this crash course in the Nutrition Facts table was helpful. While you can take it or leave it when it comes to making food decisions, it’s here to stay. And it will change slightly over the next few years.

Recipe: Delicious and Super-Easy Walnut Snack

Serves 1

Ingredients

8 walnut halves

4 dates, pitted

Instructions

Make a “date sandwich” by squeezing each date between two walnut halves.

Serve & enjoy!

Tip: Try with pecans instead.

 

References:

http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca/eating-nutrition/label-etiquetage/changes-modifications-eng.php

https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/understanding-food-labels/percent-daily-value.html

http://www.healthycanadians.gc.ca/eating-nutrition/label-etiquetage/regulatory-guidance-directives-reglementaires/daily-values-valeurs-quotidiennes/guide-eng.php#p1

 

5 Tips for Better Sleep

Have you said “bye bye” to sleeping through the night?

Are you feeling exhausted or “running on stress hormones” all day?

Do not fear, I have some great tips (and an amazing recipe) for you!

The science of sleep is fascinating, complicated and growing

Sleep is this daily thing that we all do and yet we’re just beginning to understand all of the ways it helps us and all of the factors that can affect it.

Lack of sleep affects just about everything in your body and mind. People who get less sleep tend to be at higher risk for so many health issues like diabetes, heart disease, and certain types of cancer; not to mention effects like slower metabolism, weight gain, hormone imbalance, and inflammation. And don’t forget the impact lack of sleep can have on moods, memory and decision-making skills.

Do you know that lack of sleep may even negate the health benefits of your exercise program? (Gasp!)

OMG – What aspect of health does sleep not affect???

Knowing this it’s easy to see the three main purposes of sleep:

  • To restore our body and mind. Our bodies repair, grow and even “detoxify” our brains while we sleep.
  • To improve our brain’s ability to learn and remember things, technically known as “synaptic plasticity”.
  • To conserve some energy so we’re not just actively “out and about” 24-hours a day, every day.

Do you know how much sleep adults need? It’s less than your growing kids need but you may be surprised that it’s recommended that all adults get 7 – 9 hours a night. For real!

Try not to skimp!

(Don’t worry, I have you covered with 5 tips for better sleep below.)

5 Tips for Better Sleep

  • The biggest tip is definitely to try to get yourself into a consistent sleep schedule. Make it a priority and you’re more likely to achieve it. This means turning off your lights 8 hours before your alarm goes off. Seven. Days. A. Week. I know weekends can easily throw this off but by making sleep a priority for a few weeks your body and mind will adjust and thank you for it.
  • Balance your blood sugar throughout the day. You know, eat less refined and processed foods and more whole foods (full of blood-sugar-balancing fibre). Choose the whole orange instead of the juice (or orange-flavoured snack). Make sure you’re getting some protein every time you eat.
  • During the day get some sunshine and exercise. These things tell your body it’s daytime; time for being productive, active and alert. By doing this during the day it will help you wind down more easily in the evening.
  • Cut off your caffeine and added sugar intake after 12pm. Whole foods like fruits and veggies are fine, it’s the “added” sugar we’re minimizing. Yes, this includes your beloved chai latte. Both caffeine and added sugar can keep your mind a bit more active than you want it to be come evening. (HINT: I have a great caffeine-free chai latte recipe for you below!). And if you really want to get real, cut the added sugar all together!
  • Have a relaxing bedtime routine that starts 1 hour before your “lights out” time (that is 8 – 10 hours before your alarm is set to go off). This would include dimming your artificial lights, nixing screen time and perhaps reading an (actual, not “e”) book or having a bath.

So how many of these tips can you start implementing today?

Try the caffeine-free chai latte for your afternoon “coffee break” below:

Caffeine-Free Chai Latte Recipe

Serves 1-2

Ingredients

  • 1 bag of rooibos chai tea (rooibos is naturally caffeine-free)
  • 2 cups of boiling water
  • 1 tablespoon tahini
  • 1 tablespoon almond butter (creamy is preferred; no added sugar or oils)
  • 2 dates (optional)

Instructions

Cover the teabag and dates (if using) with 2 cups of boiling water and steep for a few minutes.

Discard the tea bag & place tea, soaked dates, tahini & almond butter into a blender.

Blend until creamy.

Serve and Enjoy!

Tip: You can try this with other nut or seed butters to see which flavour combination you like the best. Cashew butter anyone?

References:

http://www.thepaleomom.com/gotobed/

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/hacking-sleep

Diet for IBS

If you are suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), you may be thinking “what can I eat for IBS?”Below I describe the best diet for IBS.

IBS is an umbrella term used to describe a set of symptoms. There are 2 types of IBS:

  • Spastic colon-type IBS – where gripping pain is common and alternating constipation and diarrhoea.
  • Painless diarrhoea-type IBS – there is urgent diarrhoea usually upon rising and often after a meal.

Common Symptoms

  • Abdominal pain
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhoea
  • Bloating
  • Flatulence
  • Headaches
  • Cramps
  • Nausea
  • Anxiety
  • Depression

Causes

  • Food intolerances – most commonly to wheat, dairy, coffee, tea and citrus fruits. Although an intolerance can be present to any unsuspecting food.
  • Stress – your digestion shuts down during periods of stress leading to a lack of digestive enzymes and stomach acid. This can lead to incompletely digested food irritating the gut.
  • Parasites – 49% of people with IBS are known to have the parasite Blastocystis hominis. And 20% of people with IBS have the parasite Dientamoeba fragilis.
  • Gut dysbiosis – an imbalance of the good and bad bacteria present in your gut and/or overgrowth of Candida.. This can be triggered by a poor diet that has insufficient fibre, and is high in alcohol, fatty fats and sugar. Also taking antibiotics will upset this balance.
  • Other diseases – occasionally the symptoms of IBS can be mistaken for a more serious underlying condition such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis or diverticulitis. So it is very important to go and see your doctor.

Diet for IBS

Foods to Avoid for IBS

  • Refined wheat – is high in gluten, which can be irritating to the gut and is usually the biggest factor in IBS.
  • Cow’s milk – comes next.
  • Flour – from any sources gunks up the bowel in sensitive individuals.
  • Eggs,
  • Citrus fruits – especially oranges
  • High tyramine foods – such as cheese, port, red wine, sherry, beef, liver, herring, sauerkraut and yeast extracts.
  • Melted cheese – is very hard for the body to digest. Avoid at all costs.
  • Refined foods – such as white rice, pasta, cakes, pastries, alcohol, fried fodds, high-sugar foods and those foods high in saturated animal fat found in meat and dairy all deplete good bacteria in the gut and help feed the bad guys.

Foods to Eat for IBS

  • There are plenty of alternatives to wheat e.g. wheat-free bread, amaranth, spelt, millet, buckwheat, quinoa, oat and rye crisp breads, and rice and corn cakes, which are delicious.
  • You can now buy lentil-, corn-, rice- and potato-based pastas.
  • Try organic rice,almond or oat milk , or try goat’s or sheep’s milk instead of cow’s milk.
  • Eat more brown rice which is cleansing and healing to the digestive tract. As well as potatoes, fish, lean poultry, fruits and vegetables.
  • Peppermint, fennel, chamomile and rosemary teas can enhance digestion and ease discomfort.
  • Instead of orange juice, try low-sugar diluted apple, pear or pineapple juice.

Also the FODMAP diet can help with IBS.

References:

  • Courteney, H. (2008). 500 of the Most Important Health Tips You’ll Ever Need. 3rd edn. London: CICO Books. pp. 212-214

 

For more information on diet for IBS, contact Kate to book a consultation today.

Nutrition for Supporting the Adrenal Glands

With the stressful pace of modern living in the West, the adrenal glands can struggle to keep up! Your adrenal glands secrete adrenaline and other stress hormones to help you to cope with stress. When you are feeling exhausted, your adrenals give you the energy to keep going!

With constant stress, your adrenals are continuously being stimulated until they crash. This is when you can experience adrenal fatigue.

Symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue include:

  • Unable to get out of bed in the morning
  • Feeling constantly exhausted
  • Craving salty foods
  • Feel wired in the evening and unable to sleep.

People with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS/ME) often have adrenal fatigue leaving them bed bound.

So how can you use nutrition for supporting the adrenal glands?

Nutrition for Supporting the Adrenal Glands:

  • Vitamin C – boosts your adrenal glands
  • B vitamins – give you energy and help your adrenals to keep going.
  • Himalayan Pink Salt – salt supports your adrenal glands. Also Himalayan pink salt is rich in other minerals to support your adrenals. Add a pinch of this salt to all your meals.
  • Potassium – is another mineral that boosts your adrenal glands. Also it balances the sodium:potassium ratio in your cells to allow more nutrients into the cells. You can get potassium from foods including bananas, mangoes, spinach, sweet potato, acorn squash and coconut water.
  • Ashwaganda – is a herb to that helps you adapt to stress.

Foods to Avoid for Adrenal Fatigue:

  • Caffeinated foods and drinks – such as tea, coffee and chocolate all drive your adrenals to exhaustion and are best avoided.
  • Sugary foods – such as cakes, biscuits and sweets all spike your blood sugar and soon after you crash as your blood sugar drops. This puts a strain on your adrenal glands.

For more information on using nutrition for supporting your adrenal glands, contact Kate for a free 15 minute phone chat.

 

How Much Protein Do I Need?

Protein is not just for great skin, hair, and nails; it’s critical for health. Without it, you wouldn’t be able to repair damage, digest food, fight infections, build muscle and bone, create hormones, and even think and have good moods. Higher protein diets can help fight high blood pressure, diabetes, and osteoporosis. Not to mention protein’s great benefits for metabolism boosting, satiety (feeling full after a meal), and weight management.

Protein is important, and this is a given.

There are a few factors to consider when calculating how much protein we need. I go through those calculations with you. Then I list the amount of protein in some common foods.

How much protein do I need?

There isn’t a real rule that applies equally to everyone. There are a few factors to consider when figuring out how much protein you need.

Start with the minimum recommendation of 0.8 g/kg (0.36 g/lb) per day.

So, for a 68 kg (150 lb) healthy non-athlete adult, this is about 55 g protein/day.

Mind you, this is a minimum to prevent protein deficiency. It’s not optimal for good repair, digestion, immune function, muscle/bone building, hormones, thinking and great moods. It’s not enough for athletes, the elderly, or those recovering from an injury, or an illness such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, either. If you fall into one of these camps, you may need to increase the minimum protein intake. Aim closer to 1.3 g/kg (0.6 g/lb) per day.

Athletes need more protein for their energy and muscle mass. Seniors need more to help ward off muscle and bone loss that’s common in old age. And injured people need more for recovery and healing.

How much protein is too much?

As with fat and carbohydrates, eating too much protein can cause weight gain. Extra protein can be converted into sugar or fat in the body. The interesting thing about protein is that it isn’t as easily or quickly converted as carbohydrates or fat; this is because of its “thermic effect.” The thermic effect is the amount of energy required to digest, absorb, transport and store a nutrient. To digest protein, your body needs to spend energy (i.e., burn calories). More calories than when metabolising fats or carbohydrates.

If you’re concerned that high protein intake harms healthy kidneys, don’t be. If your kidneys are healthy, they are more than capable of filtering out excess amino acids from the blood. The problem only occurs in people who already have kidney issues.

FUN FACT: Plant proteins are especially safe for kidney health.

How much protein is in food?

  • A 3.5 oz chicken breast has 31 g protein.
  • A 3.5 oz salmon has 20 g protein.
  • ½ cup cooked beans contain 6-9 g protein.
  • A large egg contains 6 g protein.
  • ¼ cup nuts contains 4-7 g protein.
  • 1 medium baked potato contains 3 g protein.

Conclusion

Protein is an essential nutrient we should all get enough of. How much protein do I need? “Enough” is about 0.8 – 1.3 g/kg (0.36 – 0.6 g/lb) per day. If you’re a healthy non-athlete adult, you can aim for the lower level. If you’re an athlete, senior, or injured person, aim for the higher level.

Too much protein can cause weight gain, so it’s best to have just enough.

I’d love to know: Are you one of those people who needs more protein? Leave a comment and let me know.

Recipe (high-protein): Baked Chicken Breasts

Serves 4

Ingredients

4 boneless skinless chicken breasts
1 tbsp olive oil
1 clove garlic
1/4 tsp sea salt
½ tsp black pepper
½ tsp paprika

Instructions

Preheat oven to 450°F. Place a layer of parchment paper on a baking dish.

Place the chicken breasts in the prepared dish. Brush on both sides with olive oil.
In a small bowl, mix spices until combined. Sprinkle the spice mixture evenly over the chicken on both sides.

Bake for 15-20 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through to at least 165°F at the thickest part.
Serve & enjoy!

Tip: Serve with lots of veggies.

For more information about protein or if you are interested in purchasing my high protein vegetarian or non-vegetarian meal plan, contact Kate on 07562868342 or send a message in the contact form below! I would love to hear from you.

Mood Boosting Foods

No question that what you eat can affect how you feel, right?

Mental health and brain health are complex. So are the foods we eat, and the ways our bodies interact with those foods. While, we don’t know the exact mechanisms how food and nutrition help, we know a few ways food impacts our moods.

First, what we eat becomes the raw materials for our neurotransmitters. “Neurotransmitters” are biochemical messengers that allow our nerve cells to communicate (ever heard of serotonin?). They are important not just for thinking and memory, but also for mental health.

Second, what we eat affects our blood sugar. And having unstable blood sugar levels can contribute to mood swings.

Let’s talk about mood-boosting and mood boosting foods.

Mood boosting foods

Some nutrient deficiencies look like mental health problems; this includes deficiencies in B-vitamins, vitamin D, and the mineral selenium. So, getting enough vitamins, minerals, (and other things like antioxidants) are key. These nutrients not only reduce inflammation but also fuel the biochemical reactions in our bodies. Including those that create neurotransmitters. So make sure you’re eating a variety of nutrient-dense whole foods, especially fresh fruits and vegetables. In fact, studies show that people who eat the most fruits and vegetables are the happiest.

Also pay special attention to vitamin D (the sunshine vitamin), as it’s not naturally occurring in too many foods. Selenium is an essential mineral found in Brazil nuts, walnuts, cod, and poultry. Try to add some of those to your weekly diet.

Second, make sure you get enough protein. Protein is your body’s main supply of amino acids. Amino acids are very important for mood issues because they are the building blocks of neurotransmitters. Protein also helps to regulate blood sugar. I recommend eating protein with every meal; this includes dark green leafy vegetables, eggs, poultry, and meat.

Third, complex carbohydrates like sweet potato and quinoa are great too. They allow better absorption of key amino acids like tryptophan. Tryptophan is used by your body to make serotonin (your “happy hormone”) and melatonin (your “sleepy” hormone). So, if you want to relax, try these in the evening.

Fourth, fish and other sources of omega-3 fatty acids (nuts, seeds, and algae) are also mood-boosting. Omega-3s are definitely “brain food” and may help to ease some symptoms.

FUN FACT: One study showed that giving one multi-vitamin and one omega-3 fish oil tablet per day to prison inmates reduced the incidence of violent behaviour by 50%!

Last but not least, make sure you’re hydrated. Mild dehydration can cause mood issues as well.

 

Mood Busting Foods

You won’t be surprised to hear me say processed foods are mood-busters, right? One study suggests that eating a lot of processed foods devoid of nutrients can increase your chances of becoming depressed by as much as 60 percent! This is on top of the research that shows nutrient deficiencies can look like mental health problems.

“But it makes me feel good!”

Yes, some of these mood busters can make you feel better temporarily. Some big food companies study how to maximise the “pleasure” centres with the perfect amount of sugar, salt, and fat. Not to mention the colour, texture, and taste; they can light up our taste buds and make us feel good… for now.

A few other things to avoid are:

  • Alcohol (nervous system depressant)
  • Caffeine (may worsen anxious feelings and ability to sleep)
  • Sugar (messes with your blood sugar and can worsen inflammation).

Conclusion

Bad moods can lead to bad eating habits; and, bad eating habits can lead to bad moods. If you need a mood boost, stick to minimally processed nutrient-dense whole foods. Things like fresh fruit and vegetables (including leafy greens), nuts and seeds, eggs, fish, poultry, and meat. Avoid common mood-busting foods like alcohol, caffeine, and sugar.

And remember, sometimes “feel good” junk foods, only make you feel good temporarily. So, try my newest recipe for fruit salad, below.

Recipe (Mood Boosting): Fruit Salad

Serves 3-4

Ingredients

300g watermelon, cubed
300g cantaloupe melon, cubed
150g blueberries, fresh
150g blackberries, fresh
300g green grapes

Instructions

Place all fruit in a large bowl and gently toss.

Serve and enjoy!

Tip: Substitute or add any ready-to-eat fruit, like chopped peaches, or raspberries.

 

For more information on mood boosting foods, contact Kate for a free 15 minute consultation!

Natural Remedies to Relieve PMS

When you have pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) you may have symptoms including mood swings, anxiety, depression, breast tenderness, migraines and cramps. You get these symptoms in the week leading up to the start of your period. You may feel very uncomfortable and find it difficult to go about your day to day activities. Below I talk about natural remedies to relieve PMS.

Many women’s period cycles are in time with the 28 day cycles of the moon.

Here are my natural remedies to relieve PMS and the 4 types of PMS:

  • PMS A (Anxiety) – you may get anxiety, tension, anger and irritability with this type of PMS. It is the most common type of PMS.
  • PMS D (Depresssion) – people with this type of PMS get severe depression, tearfulness and withdrawal that can affect their everyday live. They may even feel suicidal. It is caused by low levels of the hormone progesterone and high levels of oestrogen. You need to eat more phytoestrogen containing foods such a flaxseed/linseed and fermented soya. When you eat phytoestrogens, these food block the oestrogen receptor sites in the body causing a weaker oestrogen effect.
  • PMS H (Hyperhydration) – you may get water retention, swelling, bloating, weight gain and breast tenderness with this hydration type of PMS. You need to avoid eating too much salt which increases the swelling.
  • PMS C (Cravings) – you can get strong cravings for sugar snacks and chocolate with this type of PMS. Also you may get blood sugar imbalance, headaches and fatigue.

Most women experience a different type of PMS before each period.

Natural remedies to relieve PMS including herbs:

  • Agnus castus – when you take this herb it stimulates your pituitary gland to balance the secretions of all of your hormones. It is very effective for relieving PMS and needs to taking everyday for 3 months.
  • Black cohosh – taking this herb can relieve symptoms of PMS A including anxiety and tension as well as headaches and migraines.
  • Milk thistle – helps to support your liver in detoxifying excess oestrogen and other hormones.

Caution – do not take these herbs if you are on the pill, on HRT or pregnant.

Furthermore if you would like to learn more nutrition tips for relieving PMS, contact Kate on 07562 868342 for a free 15 minute consultation!

 

Copyright: andreypopov / 123RF Stock Photo

Tips for Recovering from ME/CFS

Around 250,000 people in Britain are recognised as having M.E or Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS). Many more are undiagnosed. I suffered with severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome for 3 years. It was after visiting a Nutritionist and following her plan for a few months that I began to get my energy back. After a year I was fully recovered and back working again. Below you can read my tips for recovering from ME/CFS.

 

 

Common Symptoms

  • Chronic, debilitating fatigue
  • Muscle pains
  • Headaches
  • Poor concentration
  • Low blood pressure
  • Insomnia
  • Sensitivity to light and noise
  • Constipation

Causes of Chronic Fatigue

  • Stress
  • Viral infections e.g. Glandular Fever or Cytomegalovirus.
  • Unprocessed emotional trauma
  • Exposure to a lot of electrical equipment (EMR)
  • Have running water under your home (Geopathic stress)
  • Polio vaccination
  • Low blood sugar level
  • Heavy metal toxicity
  • Liver congestion
  • Food intolerances
  • Candida overgrowth
  • Parasites
  • Adrenal fatigue
  • Deficiencies of minerals e.g. magnesium

 

Tips for Recovering from ME/CFS

Foods to Avoid

  • Avoid any foods and drinks containing caffeine, sugar and alcohol, all of which lower the immune function, weaken the adrenal system and cause imbalance with blood sugar levels.
  • Most mass produced, tinned foods and takeaways are lacking in magnesium. Most M.E patients have low levels if this vital mineral.
  • Avoid energy drinks such as Red Bull which contain caffeine which will only serve to weaken you in the long term.
  • If you find yourself constantly craving foods such as wheat, sugar and snacks, are bloated, have an urgency to urinate, suffer mood swings and are always tired, you may well have Candida overgrowth. Follow the anti-candida diet.
  • Almost everyone with chronic fatigue will have multiple food intolerances, the most common being to wheat and cow’s milk.

Foods to Eat

  • Essential fats are vital for people with M.E since they support the endocrine system, boost immunity and help to balance blood sugar. Therefore eat more pumpkin seeds, flaxseeds, walnuts and oily fish such as salmon, mackerel, anchovies, sardines and herring.
  • It is vital that you eat good-quality protein such as organic meat, chicken, fresh fish, beans or lentils at least twice a day. Protein boosts the immune system and helps to balance blood sugar for longer periods.
  • Eat plenty of wholegrain cereals, leafy green vegetables such as cabbage, kale, spring greens, pak choy, broccoli, and brazil nuts, walnuts, almonds, curries, black strap molasses and beans which are all rich in magnesium.
  • Replace wheat with amaranth, buckwheat, quinoa, millet, brown rice, oats and wheat free bread.
  • Drink at least 2 litres of filtered water daily to help detoxify your system.

Lifestyle Tips

  • Do some gentle exercise such a pilates stretches to gradually tone the muscles and help to drain the lymph system which is often overloaded.
  • Learn to relax. Meditation is a great way to give the body and brain a complete rest. Try listening to relaxing music such as sounds of nature.
  • Have a massage to drain the lymph system and soothe aching muscles.
  • Look into ozone therapy to oxygenate the body.
  • Many people have been cured of M.E by energy healers.
  • If you symptoms persist, try having your house dowsed for electrical and geopathic stress. To find a dowser contact The British Dowsing Society.
  • Visit a counsellor as many people discover that their ME/CFS was triggered by an emotional trauma and speaking about it helps you to process it.

Recommended Testing

  • I would recommend hair mineral analysis testing for ME/CFS. This test can show you if you have adrenal fatigue, thyroid problems, blood sugar imbalances and the levels of toxic metals in your body. It can also show you the levels of minerals such as magnesium, calcium and zinc in your cells.
  • Also I would recommend doing a food intolerance blood test to check for sensitivities to wheat, cow’s milk and other foods. Alternatively you can find a practitioner who uses a bio-feedback machine to test for food intolerances as well as for the presence of viruses and Candida.

 

Furthermore if you would like to learn more nutrition tips for recovering from ME/CFS, contact Kate on 07562 868342 for a free 15 minute consultation!

 

10 Anti-Inflammatory Foods

In the western world we eat a diet high in wheat, dairy, sugar. These foods can cause acidity and inflammation in the body. Our diet is high in omega 6 and low in omega 3 which can lead to production of arachadonic acid and inflammatory pathways in the body. This can lead to chronic inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and heart disease. However we have the power to reduce inflammation and feel better by changing our diet. When we include anti-inflammatory foods in our diet, inflammation and pain can be eased. Furthermore your joints work more smoothly, cell membranes are held together and immune cells produces less histamine.

Here are my recommended top 10 anti-inflammatory foods:

  1. Oily fish – is rich in omega 3 that stimulates anti-inflammatory pathways in the body, reducing inflammation. Oily fish rich in omega 3 include mackerel, sardines, salmon, anchovies and herring.
  2. Ginger – is a root herb that improves circulation in the fingers and toes. Also it can prevent nausea and reduce inflammation in the body.
  3. Turmeric -is a spice that can reduce inflammation. It decreases permeability in the blood-brain barrier to prevent brain inflammation and cognitive decline. Furthermore it fights cancer.
  4. Nuts & seeds – plant based sources of omega 3 include walnuts, flaxseed/linseed, chia seeds, hemp seeds and pumpkin seeds.
  5. Green leafy vegetables – are rich in minerals and alkalise the body, reducing acidosis and the associated inflammation. Also they are rich in vitamin C which acts as a natural anti-histamine to reduce inflammation.
  6. Extra virgin olive oil – contains the chemical oleocanthal that acts similarly to ibuprofen to reduce pain and inflammation.
  7. Garlic – this potent herb can help to reduce joint swelling.
  8. Green tea – is rich in polyphenol antioxidants and helps to reduce inflammation.
  9. Blueberries – are rich in the antioxidant quercetin that protects the body from oxidant stress, reducing inflammation.
  10. Pineapple – contains the digestive enzyme bromelain. Bromelain helps to regulate the immune system and prevent unwanted inflammation.

Finally if you would like more information about how to reduce pain and inflammation, contact Kate on 07652 868342 or info@kateoriordan.com. You can receive personalised advice including a nutrition plan and supplement plan.

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Anti-Candida Diet

Candida Albicans is a yeast that is found in found in low levels in the gut. However problems can arise when the yeast begins to overgrow in the gut. When you follow an anti-Candida diet, it can help to reduce the Candida naturally without the use of antibiotics.

 

 

Causes of Candida Overgrowth:

  • Overuse of antibiotics
  • Long-term use of the pill
  • Steroids
  • Chemotherapy
  • Diabetes
  • HIV
  • Pregnancy

Symptoms of Candida Overgrowth:

  • Bloating
  • Flatulence
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhoea
  • Cravings for sugar and wheat
  • Headaches
  • Brain fog
  • Mood swings
  • Skin rashes
  • Recurrent thrush
  • Arthritis-type aching joints
  • Chronic fatigue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to treat Candida Naturally

It is crucial to kill the Candida or keep it under control by using an anti-Candida diet, herbs and supplements.

Anti-Candida Diet

Foods to Avoid:

  • Remove all yeast and fermented food from the diet for 2-4 weeks. This includes bread, all aged or mouldy cheese, beer, wine, vinegar, miso, tempeh and mushrooms. Also avoid mould forming foods such as peanuts, peanut butter and cashew nuts.
  • Try to avoid all white-flour products for at least one month including crackers, pizza and pasta.
  • Avoid any form of sugar for one month including cane sugar, beet sugar, honey and really sweet fruits such as bananas, raisins and dates. Also avoid fruit juices and canned drinks for this period as they are high in sugar.

 

Foods to Eat:

  • Garlic is a potent anti-fungal. Raw is best.
  • Eat fresh fish, chicken, turkey, lean meats, eggs, cooked tofu and pulses.
  • Eat more artichokes, asparagus, aubergine, avocado, broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, celery, green beans, leeks, lettuce, garlic, onion, parsnips, spinach, tomatoes and watercress.
  • Fruits that are okay to eat during the detox are apples, pears, raspberries, blueberries and cherries.
  • Use low-sugar organic rice or almond milk instead of cow’s milk.
  • Eat live, unsweetened yoghurt containing healthy bacteria acidophilus and bifidus.
  • Make your own dairy free water kefir which is a probiotic.

If you would like a detailed diet and supplement plan that is personalised to your specific requirements, contact Kate to book an initial consultation.

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